Madonna Heights article pending

For more than 50 years, our Madonna Heights Group Residence, has worked with adolescent girls struggling at home and in school, often due to trauma. Located on a 56 acre campus in Dix Hills, Long Island, our program is designed for girls who have been living at home and receiving services to no avail, or have been living in an intensive residential program and are in need of a place to transition before returning home.

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Sometimes one of the best ways to reach a young woman is through nonverbal communication, at Madonna Heights, we recognize that. We offer an intensive therapeutic art program and New Heights, an adventure course which emphasizes physical activities and group work. It is important that our young women learn to speak up for themselves, which is why we have developed youth leadership and peer mediation programs, which give our girls a sense of advocacy, power and confidence.

We pair each child with their own advocate counselor to ensure they make the most of their experience. We offer individual and group counseling, wellness coaching, substance abuse programs and college and career planning. Perhaps most importantly, we focus on repairing family ties to help our girls make a smooth transition when they are ready to head back home. Just recently, Madonna Heights held its first Family Fun Night to provide a relaxed time for parents to be with their daughters.

Said one parent: “I know that my daughter has a lot of good to share with the world, she just needed some help getting there…and that started with me and you, together as partners. I feel that with your help, her life may have been saved. I am forever grateful.”

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Our holistic approach includes trauma-informed care and treatment, helping these young women face their problems with unflinching honesty so that they can first heal and then move on to create a better life for themselves.

“The help I have received and the relationships I have developed made me able to not only trust but to be trustworthy,” said one young woman.

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