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Art Therapy Exhibit at Sea Cliff Library Showcases Talents of Children and Young Adults

November 12, 2019 / SCO News

sea cliff art therapy program SCO Family of Services celebrated the opening of a new art exhibit at the Sea Cliff Library that showcases artwork by children and young adults from SCO’s Robert J. McMahon Children’s Center. Sea Cliff Mayor Edward Lieberman was among the guests in attendance at the opening reception on November 6.

Located in Sea Cliff, the Robert J. McMahon Children’s Center (RJMCC) serves 73 children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. RJMCC includes a Residential Treatment Center that provides 24-hour nursing care, social services, and a variety of therapies that help youth with special needs unlock their potential and achieve higher levels of independence. Residents of RJMCC attend the Tyree Learning Center, an on-site special education school designed to accommodate the children’s needs.

Curated by SCO Art Therapist Suzanna Shayer, the exhibit includes 21 works of art created by program participants as part of their therapeutic treatment plan. This marks the fourth year SCO has collaborated with the library on this special exhibit, which runs through the end of December.  “We love exhibiting at the library,” remarked Ms. Shayer. “It gives us a chance to engage with our local community and share the talents of the young people we serve.”

The art show features a selection of pieces utilizing a variety of media including paint, photography, and mixed-media materials – all created during art therapy groups. Since art is a visual medium, art therapy provides an opportunity for non-verbal communication and expression…

Artwork will be for sale throughout the months of November and December to support recreational programming at the RJMCC. If interested in purchasing an original work of art during the exhibit, please contact Suzanna Shayer at sshayer@sco.org or 516.629.8169.

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